50 years of women in space

50 years of women in space
On 16 June 1963, Valentina Tereshkova became the first woman in orbit. The Cité de l'Espace in Toulouse is celebrating the fiftieth anniversary of this event with an exhibition opened by Claudie Haigneré, the first French woman in space.



Portraits of female astronauts, an exclusive video interview with Valentina Tereshkova, anecdotes and figures: the exhibition “50 years of women in space!” will explain the female aspect of space conquest.
Credit: Enjoy Space


Two years after Yuri Gagarin went into space; his fellow Soviet Valentina Tereshkova demonstrated that women too had their place. A flight that would take part in a political context, given the competition between the Soviet Union and the United States against the backdrop of the Cold War. But there would be a 19-year wait for the second woman to be launched into Earth’s orbit! This Enjoy Space feature reflects on women’s difficult path in manned space flight.


Claudie Haigneré (left), first French woman in space, and Aude Lesty of the Cité de l’Espace in front of some of the photos representing all the women who have been into space since 1963.
Credit: Enjoy Space


In Toulouse, the Cité de l’Espace has decided to pay tribute to the 57 women to date who have participated in a space mission, whether as the single occupant of a spacecraft (Valentina Tereshkova, the only woman to have accomplished a solo space flight), mission specialist, pilot or even commander. Designed by Aude Lesty at the Cité de l’Espace, the exhibition was opened on 31 May by Claudie Haigneré. Which is quite logical since she was the first (and to date only) French woman to travel into space and is the patron of the Toulouse-based space park.


Claudie Haigneré, here with Philippe Droneau, Manager of the Visitors’ Department at the Cité de l’Espace, also took part in the children’s scientific congress on 31 May that took place at the Toulouse-based space park.
Credit: Enjoy Space

Published 3 June 2013